Tag - Typography

X is for X-Height

X was especially hard to come up with a topic for. Hence why I have chosen a small (yet important) part of typography: x-height!

The x-height is the invisible line that most lowercase letters are as tall as. The exceptions to this are b, d, f, h, k, and l. For these letters, the x-height dictates the height of their waistline — the top of the body of the letter.

The reason the x-height is named thusly is because it marks the proper optical height of the lowercase letter x in a typeface. Sometimes, a type designer may make rounded letters — such as c, o, and e — slightly taller than the x-height to make up for any optical illusion that causes the letters to not look the same height.

Other important guidelines that dictate the height and length of letters are the ascender line, cap height, baseline, and the descender line.

 

I hope you’ve found this small glimpse into type helpful!

T is for Typography

Typography is the study, use, and design of letterforms but there are so many different subcategories of typography that it is hard to really say that that truly covers it all. Typography began about 3000 BCE with the advent of written language in Mesopotamia and has changed and developed immensely over time.

Before I went to school for graphic design, I went to college for creative writing and took many anthropology courses. I learned a bit about typography through our sections on linguistics and loved it. Because of this, I was excited to get to the module on typography and I was definitely not disappointed. The development and evolution of written languages is amazing. If you are interested in learning more about type, I recommend reading Exploring Typography – 2nd Edition by Tova Rabinowitz Deer. It was the assigned textbook for my class and has an immense amount of information about the history of typography. It’s a great starting point!

Aside from the history of typography, there are many different aspects of type that one must learn in order to fully understand typography. Typographic terminology is a great starting point after learning some of the basic history as it allows you to understand terms as you continue to learn. These terms will help you learn about type family classifications, readability and legibility, layout and grids, and designing type.

Designing your own type can be really fun. There are technical aspects of course, but sometimes you can just play around and make type out of anything.

Here is a fun alphabet I created out of paperclips for an assignment:

Paperclip Alphabet - Typography

Have you ever tried to create your own type?

Q is for Pull Quote

A pull quote is a line of text that is taken from the body copy of an article or blog post that is enlarged and placed within the body text to give the eyes a break and bring attention to an important section of the story.

This is what a pull quote can look like in a blog post!

Pull quotes are especially used in magazine articles. They can bring some extra “pop” to the page when an image is unavailable or would not fit.

They can also be called a blockquote!

So rather than just having a full page of body copy, try adding some pull quotes for variety! But don’t add to many or it takes away from the whole. A pull quote should be something exciting and worthwhile for it to really make an impact.

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